Jun 112015
 

It’s time for my 2015 self-assessment. To be honest, I’ve slipped in the past year. If I’d written this self-assessment last year, in spring 2014, I’d have given myself stellar marks almost across the board.

In the past year, I quit my job, began traveling a lot more, went through a breakup, and let my diet and nutritional program fall by the wayside a bit. I gave in to my sugar cravings more, even if that means organic ice cream instead of Hostess Cupcakes. In other words, I was human.

This doesn’t mean I feel like an awful person — I’m a little anxious about not being on track, but I know that any day is the day I can turn it up full-volume again. Health is the sum of 100 little decisions we make each day, plus luck. This year, I’m making about 70 right decisions and 30 wrong decisions per day, instead of holding a 98-2 record. I need to step it up.

Enough excuses, here’s my self-assessment:

1. Neutralize emotional chaos.
Assessment: Fair to good. After completely mastering my emotions and embracing life for its awesomeness in the present, I got knocked back by two breakups (with the same boyfriend) and all the accompanying worries and insecurities. I found myself wallowing a bit, especially the second time, and failing to see the good all around me. I’m still able to feel and focus on my inner light, but it’s harder than before, and I hope this cloud passes soon. I also spend some time stressed about the future, even though I know I’m working toward my long-term goals and this requires a step back from “conventional” measures of success.

2. Sleep early and well.
Assessment: Fairly awful. The same thing I wrote in 2013 applies. I sleep well when I go to sleep early. I still stay up later than I should, often till 1 or 1:30 a.m. My goal should be to go to sleep around 11 p.m. This rarely happens, and it’s an obvious place to try for improvement.

3. Avoid alcohol and artificial hormones.
Assessment: Good until recently, then fairly awful. I don’t drink alcohol much, usually once a month or less. I also try to avoid conventional dairy. But I often drink tap water when traveling, and it contains hormone residues. None of this is the elephant in the room: I froze my eggs in April, so I endured a short-term bombardment of hormone shots. The shots contained recombinant FSH and human LH, not estrogen or progesterone, but the FSH and LH stimulated my body to produce more estrogen than normal. (Edit: I told my doctor about this in advance, and he okay’ed it as a short-term procedure. I didn’t just go rogue!) I accepted this as a short-term hit to my health, but its effects lasted longer than I expected, stretching through the next cycle (hello, heart palpitations!) and even beyond. I feel like my body is still getting back to normal. If I could do it over, I’d make the same decision, but I knew when I started the process that I was only doing it once. And I’m sticking with that call: It’s too risky for me to do it more than once. On the other hand, I feel much calmer and more in control of my own destiny as I head toward forty.

4. Eat organic whenever possible.
Assessment: Good. I eat organic at home and buy organic groceries when traveling. I try to buy organic vegetable juice whenever possible (i.e., at a health food store) and minimize organic fruit juice, since I prefer eating whole fruit to get the benefit of fiber and minimize sugar. I also seek out organic restaurants as much as I can. When I go out with other people, I eat more conventionally, though I try to stick with vegetarian or fish entrees. My biggest weakness is pasta with cheese, technically a “vegetarian” entree (doesn’t mean it’s healthy!). I do best when I can talk my dinner companion into sushi. I’ve been eating way too many sweets. Even if they’re organic, they’re not good for me.

5. Get moving.
Assessment: Pretty good. I walk a lot, especially when traveling in cities. I wish I had my rebounder, but I got rid of it when I started traveling. If I needed to, I could order a rebounder fairly cheaply in the places I visit for a month or more, but I haven’t done it yet.

6. Get adequate iodine and vitamin D.
Assessment: Good. I take 2000-4000 IU of vitamin D daily, plus iodine in the form of Atlantic kelp. I’m taking more iodine than I used to (up to twice as much), which is a tweak to my supplement program.

7. Invest in a good drinking water filter and shower filter.
Assessment: Fair. At home, I have an Aquasana countertop filter for drinking water (I got rid of the distiller when I moved) and an Aquasana shower filter. On the road, it’s a different story: I often end up drinking Brita-filtered water, and there’s rarely a shower filter. One thing that helps is getting tea from Starbucks (Starbucks uses triple-filtered water that sometimes includes a reverse osmosis process), but I’ve stopped lugging around glass bottles of water.

8. Reduce xenoestrogens and toxins in your environment.
Assessment: Fair. At home, I’ve replaced my own cleaning products, toiletries and cosmetics with organic and/or green versions. However, I’ve slipped back to using regular deodorant (I just couldn’t find an alternative deodorant that was truly effective), and when traveling, I often pack my own soap and shampoo but sometimes skip it for short trips. I think the worst thing is that I’ve slipped back to using regular laundry detergent. I’d like to try to use more “green” laundry detergent like 7th Generation, which makes individual-size packets that I could bring along on trips.

9. Take a good multivitamin, probiotics, and at least one great supplement.
Assessment: Very good. I still take most of my prescribed enzyme supplements and about half of my meal-time supplements (I’ve gotten less strict about taking vitamins while eating out — I used to step into the restroom and take them before the meal). I could do better with this but am still doing reasonably well.

10. Get outside during the day.
Assessment: Good. I spend a lot more time outside since I left my job. One thing I could improve is to remove my contacts and use glasses more when I go outside, since allowing sunlight to reach my eye directly could help me produce more melatonin at night and balance my hormones (source: John Ott has a great book about Health and Light). As we head into summer again, I’m going to try to do a better job of this.

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