Sep 152015
 

Do you know one of my least favorite words on the planet? DIET.

Why? Because DIET screams UNSUSTAINABLE. It screams TEMPORARY. And a good way of eating is neither.

Sorry for the caps overload. But I feel pretty strongly about this. Sure, extreme diets can produce results fast — but as the unsustainable nature of the diet becomes unavoidable, you can lose many or all of the results you gained.

That’s demoralizing and can create a perception of “dieting” as doomed to fail.

If you went from eating bacon five times a week to drinking nothing but green juice, how long do you think you could keep that up?

Taking massive action to change your lifestyle doesn’t have to mean going on a shock-and-awe diet. What I think is truly super-important is “overdosing on nutrition,” as Chris Wark of ChrisBeatCancer.com puts it. And that can be done in a healthy, sustainable way.

A Gradual Shift

Yes, I did go cold turkey on certain things when I started my food and supplement program — things like refined sugar, cold cuts and factory-farmed meat and dairy. But other than that, a gradual shift helped a lot. Week after week, step by step, I switched to organic, grass-fed animal products and lower-pesticide, organic fruits and vegetables. I ate more vegetables and less protein. I started taking more supplements, doing more exercise, and meditating and giving thanks.

But did I go from slouch to superstar overnight? I certainly didn’t.

It was important for me to accept my mistakes and not let them derail my entire lifestyle by making me feel like a failure. If I messed up, I just had to pick myself up and start eating and living well again the next day. As the great herbalist Dr. Richard Schulze says, “Tomorrow is what you believe and do today!”

To live that mantra is to create a new way of being.

Finding a Sustainable Lifestyle

In my own gradual phase shift, I didn’t go on a crazy 60-day green juice fast; in fact, my test results showed I needed some animal protein to stay alert and strong over the long term. With the exception of short two-day juice fasts, I kept eating fish, eggs and yogurt, though I cut out red meat and poultry.

It was so important for me to view this as a process and find a lifestyle that worked for me – one turned up loud enough to be effective but still containing foods and activities I loved.

One great way to do this was to eat MORE of the healthy foods I already adored.

Some examples: I love avocados, so I made a lot of homemade guacamole with garlic, tomato and Himalayan sea salt. I love nuts, so I ate a lot of almonds, brazil nuts and macadamia nuts. I love berries – good thing they’re super healthy! I ate a pack a day. I love Thai food so I ate fresh-made coconut curry with brown rice and vegetables (There was a takeout restaurant nearby that made homemade coconut curry and used organic ingredients. I got lucky with that!).

Zero Binging Through Abundance

By eating foods I loved, I didn’t binge at all for a year and a half. 18 months of no binging. Zero. When I craved empty calories, I ate something I loved. Because it was a sustainable lifestyle, it didn’t leave me desperate for something enjoyable.

Instead, as I felt better and better, my lifestyle itself became enjoyable. I loved rebounding because it gave me energy and I got to rock out to my favorite songs while soaring through the air. I loved eating well and juicing because I felt amazing. I loved detox baths because my skin looked great. I loved my lifestyle because it made my LIFE more awesome.

That’s not a diet. That’s a massive-action sea change, and it can last for decades.

Decades are what I want. How about you?

Aug 312015
 

I took supplements 15 minutes ago. Sixteen pancreatic enzyme capsules, along with magnesium and bromelain.

I’ve taken these supplements thousands of times in the past four years. Sometimes I’m religious in taking them, and sometimes (especially lately) I’m lax. But I always return to the path. Because if I don’t, I’m toast.

That’s a fairly sobering thought. It might not be entirely true — I’m confident I could find another solution to stay well, because I don’t give up — but having found something that works for me, I’m reluctant to deviate from it. I’m happy to adjust, to dial up or dial down depending on how my body is responding, but the idea of discontinuing my supplement program never crosses my mind.

I’m dedicating the next two weeks to getting entirely back on track.

So this will be my schedule:

Upon arising: 2 beta glucan capsules.
Five times per day: 16 enzyme capsules with magnesium and bromelain.
Once per day at bedtime: RNA/DNA capsules with magnesium.
With meals: “Regular” vitamins and minerals, plus two RM-10 caplets with breakfast and dinner.
Once per day before breakfast: Garden of Life Women’s RAW Probiotics.
Once per day: Half a teaspoon of organic dandelion root powder.

In addition, I’ll be doing some detox procedures (a.k.a. my home spa-time). These will include:
Once per day: Lymph stimulation with a natural bristle brush (this is a nice skin massage!).
Once per day: Foot soak with mustard and cayenne.
Twice per week: Baking soda and sea salt bath (fantastic for skin!).

For food, I’ll eat organic, relying primarily on the following staples:
Organic raw almonds
Organic raw brazil nuts
Organic yogurt with flaxseeds
Organic raw multi-grain cereal with honey
Organic apples and berries
Organic pasture-raised eggs
Organic black rice
Organic whole wheat pasta with olive oil and butter
Organic garlic
Wild-caught fish (twice per week) or organic grass-fed beef (once per week)
Organic carrots, yams, salad and other veggies (beets if I can find them)
Organic green tea
Purified water: 8-10 glasses per day

I’ll report on how I feel after following this “reset program” and sleeping at least 7 hours per night.

It’s a trek. Time to keep trekking.

May 132013
 

Two years ago, I wrote about 10 Changes I was making in my life. Here is my 2013 self-assessment:

1. Neutralize emotional chaos.
Assessment: I’ve done astonishingly well on this front. At first, I used The Healing Code. This helped significantly with some old traumas, less significantly with others. I did the program spottily, a couple of weeks here, a couple of weeks there, one memory at a time. I also gained a great deal from hypnosis — at a time when I was desperate and searching for anything that might help, I did a past-life regression and a life-between-lives session. I was shocked to find that these two sessions put to rest some uneasiness I’d never understood and helped me become comfortable with letting my inner light shine. (I realize this sounds new-agey — I don’t care.) I feel comfortable in my own skin now, in my own soul. I’ve learned not to question why certain things work, but to accept and be happy that they do. On a similar note, I went to see a man named Braco, an energy worker from Croatia. Once again, I don’t understand why this worked, but it did. Before seeing Braco, I was an extreme Type A and could not relax. After seeing Braco, I am still Type A, but I found I was able to relax and really do nothing for the first time in my life. To just sit on my couch and breathe. To feel the flow of the universe and the many creatures in it.

Only when I was truly able to love myself, did the ultrasound nodule they wanted to biopsy disappear. Yes, it disappeared. I’ll talk about it more later.

2. Sleep early and well.
Assessment: Fairly awful. I do sleep well — when I go to sleep early. I made significant progress (no more 3am work binges) but still go to bed much later than I probably should. If I needed to “turn up the volume” in my wellness program, this would be one obvious place to do it. I aim to go to sleep around 11 — it’s usually more like midnight or 1. This is bad because the adrenals re-charge mainly between 11pm and 1am.

3. Avoid alcohol and artificial hormones.
Assessment: Very good. I had champagne on New Year’s Eve and it was the first drink I’d had in years. I may now begin enjoying a rare glass of very good red wine. But alcohol is essentially out of my life. So are artificial hormones — no more birth control pills, ever. I probably still get a little hormone residue when I drink green tea made with unfiltered tap water at work, or when I don’t realize there’s conventional dairy 1 in something I order at a restaurant. But I’m doing well overall in this area.

4. Eat organic whenever possible.
Assessment: Very good. I eat organic at home. I juice organic vegetables only — why concentrate pesticides in a cup and then drink them? I strive to eat organic at restaurants, and I choose my restaurants carefully. I eat as-organic-as-possible at other people’s houses, without being ridiculous.

5. Get moving.
Assessment: Good but not great. I walk a lot — probably at least a mile per day, often two miles. I use a rebounder (mini-trampoline), but not consistently. If I could consistently use the rebounder for about 15 minutes per day, I’d meet all of my exercise goals. This is a goal for 2013.

6. Get adequate iodine and vitamin D.
Assessment: Excellent. My doctor determined my optimal vitamin D intake (it was lower than I expected — about 3000 IU. I wasn’t absorbing higher amounts before, because other nutrients/minerals were out of balance) and iodine intake (again, lower than expected). I have normal levels of iodine and vitamin D now.

7. Invest in a good drinking water filter and shower filter.
Assessment: Very good. I use a distiller at home and drink truly pure water whenever possible. I also have an Aquasana countertop water filter for cooking water and for times when I don’t have time to make distilled water. However, I need to change the filter frequently because of high sediment levels, and I’m not sure of the quality at all times. I use an Aquasana shower filter and it works great. When I’m not home, I try to drink tea made with filtered water (Starbucks uses triple-filtered water that includes a reverse osmosis process!) or bottled water in glass — but I only succeed about half the time. The other half, I confess I’m drinking Brita-filtered water (not as good) or tap water.

8. Reduce xenoestrogens and toxins in your environment.
Assessment: Good but not great. I’ve replaced my own cleaning products, toiletries and cosmetics with organic and/or green versions. However, at work and when traveling, I use what’s available for soap, shampoo, etc.

9. Take a good multivitamin, probiotics, and at least one great supplement.
Assessment: Excellent. After stumbling on this front initially, I found a great doctor-ally and got great results. All of my deficiencies are now corrected, my toxicities are under control, and my body is getting healthier and healthier. My one great supplement is pancreatic enzymes, and I also use beta 1,3 d-glucan.

10. Get outside during the day.
Assessment: Fair. I do a better job in summer than in winter, because there’s more benefit from being outside during summer months (from a vitamin D perspective). But I still spend too much time inside, tied to a computer, in all seasons.

Jun 062011
 

Some tempered good news: The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit ruled last month that the USDA must produce an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for genetically modified sugar beets, prior to granting them permanent approval for commercial use. A full press release is posted at the Center for Food Safety website.

However, GM sugar beets planted last winter are still in the ground. Moreover, the USDA on April 7 announced a pilot program that could allow agribusiness firms to directly influence the content of Environmental Impact Statements. The Federal Register notice states:

“The pilot project will explore two voluntary mechanisms: (1) A petitioner-submitted environmental report based upon which APHIS would develop an EA or an EIS; and (2) an EA or EIS prepared by a contractor, funded by a cooperative services agreement between the petitioner and APHIS.”

(Note: The “petitioner” is the firm seeking approval for a product.)

So, although the court ruling mandating an EIS seems like progress, the independence of the EIS itself does not seem assured.

In the meantime, until full, independent, objective safety studies are available that counter the limited animal studies showing negative outcomes such as liver and kidney damage, I strongly believe that the best defense against GM foods is to avoid them whenever possible. Buying organic is one way to avoid GM foods, but if that’s not possible, avoidance of processed foods or careful label-reading can help.

No, GM foods are not specifically labeled as such. But the main GM components of the food supply — what I like to call the Four Horsemen of GMOs — are:

  • Corn
  • Soy
  • Cottonseed
  • Canola

That damns a lot of processed foods right there, because they may contain all sorts of derivative products: high-fructose corn syrup, cornstarch, soy lecithin, soybean oil, canola oil, and cottonseed oil are among the most common. If a food package lists any of these ingredients and doesn’t say non-GMO, chances are that it contains GM ingredients.

Other GM products may include papayas, alfalfa sprouts, and, yes, sugar beets. It’s a jungle out there. But there are ways to make a difference.

Apr 122011
 

Worthwhile reading today on page 1 of USA Today. The cover story is titled ‘Girls hit puberty earlier than ever, and doctors aren’t sure why.’

Here’s a brief excerpt with the grim stats:

About 15% of American girls now begin puberty by age 7, according to a study of 1,239 girls published last year in Pediatrics. One in 10 white girls begin developing breasts by that age — twice the rate seen in a 1997 study. Among black girls, such as Laila, 23% hit puberty by age 7.

“Over the last 30 years, we’ve shortened the childhood of girls by about a year and a half,” says Sandra Steingraber, author of a 2007 report on early puberty for the Breast Cancer Fund, an advocacy group. “That’s not good.”

I give this article credit for hinting at the reasons why puberty is starting earlier. It addresses rising rates of childhood obesity; endocrine disruptors such as pesticides, phthalates in water bottles, and BPA in cans; and reduction of melatonin levels triggered by overexposure to computer and TV screens. It also mentions stress and premature birth rates (up 18% since 1990, according to the article) as possible causes. What it doesn’t mention — and what I rarely see in articles of this type — is an acknowledgment that many of the problems and diseases of modern life are interlinked, so early puberty cannot really be viewed in isolation.

One indication that the problem is modern life and not genetics is mentioned in the article:

Studies consistently show that black girls in the USA go into puberty earlier than whites, suggesting a possible genetic difference. Yet Steingraber notes that, 100 years ago, black girls actually matured later than whites. And she notes that black girls in Africa enter puberty much later than those in the USA, even when their nutrition and family incomes are comparable.

Since we can’t turn back the clock to the year 1900, how can we fight back against the onslaught of contaminated food, water, and environmental surroundings? I discuss some ideas in the 10 Changes section in relation to general health, but this is what I would do if I had a daughter:

1. Choose organic dairy. Conventional dairy products may contain recombinant bovine growth hormone (rBGH) and/or recombinant bovine somatotropin (rBST). These hormones stimulate increased milk production by cows, but that milk also contains higher than normal levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). What is IGF-1? A trigger of puberty in mice, according to recent research from Johns Hopkins. 1 I look forward to the human studies — in the meantime, organic milk is unlikely to contain such high levels of IGF-1. Plus, it is free of antibiotic residues, and the cows cannot be fed genetically modified corn. Honestly, I might go easy on dairy in general, since most mammals in nature don’t consume it after they’re weaned.

2. Banish high-fructose corn syrup. Since obesity is a possible contributor to early puberty, I would seek out products unlikely to promote obesity. That means real, unrefined food — organic fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, lean meats and eggs, beans, and whole grains, ideally speaking. If that were not entirely possible, I would at least avoid likely contributors to the obesity epidemic, such as HFCS. 2

3. Dump the plastic water bottles and canned foods. I would use stainless steel water bottles (less breakable than glass) and fill them with filtered tap water, using a high-quality reverse osmosis or combination filtration system (such as Aquasana). And I would seek out food packaged in BPA-free cans, glass jars, or bags.

4. Encourage outdoors time. I would make sure the day included some active time outside in real sunlight. Humans aren’t built to live indoors 24/7.

5. Enforce screen-off time. I would install Flux on all computers. I would set the computer to shut down automatically about an hour before bedtime. I would turn off the television about an hour before bedtime. I would encourage the reading of old-fashioned paper books — not on-screen books — in that last hour before sleep.

Mar 082011
 

Headlines in January covered the USDA’s unrestricted approval of GM alfalfa.

Dr. Joseph Mercola now has a scathing analysis on his site about potential long-term implications of the decision. He interviewed representatives from the Institute for Responsible Technology, Organic Valley, Whole Foods and the Organic Consumers Association — and then made some good points. The key highlight: Most alfalfa is not sprayed with pesticides now, so why would any need arise for a Roundup-resistant version?

Mercola (via his sources’ interviews) analyzes a possible ulterior motive as follows:

“‘The interesting thing about the way alfalfa has been grown up until now is that, according to Michael Pollan and other experts, 93 percent of the alfalfa grown in the United States right now is not sprayed with herbicides… alfalfa is pretty much an herbicide free crop!’ Cummins says.

“‘Now, what’s going to happen is that Monsanto is going to sell their alfalfa seeds all over the country which make this alfalfa roundup resistant. This means they’re going to spray the heck out of these 23 million acres of alfalfa fields.’

“How can anyone justify the planting of Roundup-resistant alfalfa when there’s apparently no need for it, and when emerging evidence shows that weeds are rapidly becoming increasingly resistant to Roundup as well, creating superweeds that are near impossible to get rid of?

“That seemingly nonsensical decision becomes clearer if you look at alfalfa’s role on a much grander scale, and helps explain why Monsanto appears to have pulled out all the stops to get it approved, despite the fervent opposition of the organic industry and hundreds of thousands of vocal consumers.

Alfalfa is the Perfect Choice if You Want to Contaminate a Wide Variety of Organic Foods!

“Alfalfa is a perennial crop, meaning it comes back year after year. In the case of alfalfa, farmers only need to re-seed about every seventh year. And as stated earlier, it’s a powerful pollinator.

“‘Basically, any organic alfalfa or non-genetically engineered alfalfa within a five mile radius will immediately get contaminated,’ Cummins says.

“‘Given the fact that alfalfa is a major food source for dairy cows across the United States, and organic alfalfa is a major food source for organic dairy cows, we’re going to see widespread contamination getting worse every year… by this GM alfalfa.

“‘So this is outrageous. It totally flies in the face of campaign promises that Obama made in 2008 when he was running for president. It totally flies in the face of what Hillary Clinton, who was also running for president at the time, made, which was that they would support mandatory labeling and safety testing of GMOs. They have gone back on their word…'”

What now? I highlighted this article mainly because Mercola outlines several ways to take action at the end of it. If you really care about this issue, take a few minutes to sign up to help stop GM food’s pervasive spread. This is one of those battles that can be won, because it’s not too late. Time is growing short, though.

Mar 052011
 

I do not advocate any particular diet — the “right” diet seems to vary widely based on ethnic origin, lifestyle, and individual biochemistry. As an extreme example, “The China Study” makes a compelling argument for a vegetarian diet, yet the Inuits historically ate almost entirely meat and remained free of most degenerative diseases.

What can be said, almost with certainty, is the following: Eat real food, organic when possible. By “real” food, I mean food that is recognizable as food. I have a strong opinion about this: If an ingredient list reads like a chemistry experiment, perhaps it is one, and perhaps you are the test subject. Put it back on the shelf. In sending this simple message with your food choices, you encourage food producers to provide more real-food options.

On the organic front, it is true that organic food may not be more nutritious than conventional food, and it is almost always more expensive. But what it does not include — pesticides — can make a big difference in your health. Even grains and beans, if they are conventional, were likely sprayed with pesticides. And standards for pesticides on imported products are more lax than for U.S.-grown produce…. If you can’t afford to buy all-organic, this list identifies the most contaminated fruits and vegetables (aka worth buying organic) and the less contaminated (save your money and go conventional).

Another reason to buy organic is that, due to labeling laws, it remains one of the only ways to avoid genetically modified (GM) foods. These foods have slight differences from the natural foods that your body recognizes — and initial animal studies show significant 1 effects 2 as a result. Yet, these GM ingredients permeate nearly all processed foods and even some conventionally grown, apparently “real” foods, such as corn. The “four horsemen” of GM foods are corn, soy, cottonseed, and canola (EDIT: plus sugar beets and alfalfa). If you look at ingredient lists, you will see these offenders in many forms, such as high-fructose corn syrup, canola oil, cottonseed oil, corn oil, cornstarch, and even lecithin (an emulsifier that is usually soy-based). Other GM foods include some Hawaiian papayas and, soon to come, alfalfa.