Sep 182015
 

I’ve tried a lot of different things in my journey through the crazy world of health and wellness. It’s hard to capture all of them in my 10 Steps, so here are 10 specific things that I believe were game-changers in my success:

1. I learned how to relax and enjoy life in the least relaxing situation ever. Not easy, but until I figured this out, the rest was just slapping Band-Aids on a seeping wound. Life is risk, we’re all here to learn, and I reached out for help when I needed it. Find what works for you to neutralize emotional chaos.

2. I juice vegetables, not fruits. I want to EAT my fruits to get all the good fiber they bring to the table. Fiber also helps slow down my body’s absorption of fructose, so I can avoid insulin spikes.

In contrast, vegetables usually pack less fructose and more anti-cancer nutrients into every square centimeter, so I juice them to make that goodness even more concentrated. (Note: I only juice organic vegetables, which have less pesticide on them. Why would I want to concentrate pesticides in a cup?)

Side note: When I juice vegetables, I add beets and carrots to my green juice. I believe in a rainbow of flavors — and colors. I believe adding a beet is a huge benefit for me, because it kicks up my liver and helps it work better.

3. I eat a pack of organic red raspberries whenever I can. I used to be a pack-a-day eater. Red raspberries can shut down the type of cancer I had, so I viewed it as cheap insurance, not expensive berries.

4. I eat watercress whenever and wherever I find it. Watercress is hard to find where I live. But whenever I see it, organic or not, at a supermarket or a restaurant, I snap it up and eat it, because I believe it’s the healthiest vegetable on the entire planet.

5. I take organic dandelion root powder. I want to help my liver be the best it can be. So I take half a teaspoon of this wonderful herb daily.

6. I eat flaxseeds. They pack a punch against cancer in different ways than the other foods I eat.

7. I ate button mushrooms and drank green tea almost every day for two years. I read about this trick in Patrick Quillin’s book Beating Cancer with Nutrition. He’s a registered dietician (there are good ones out there! A few…), and he wrote that eating both foods in a single day could reduce the risk of breast cancer by about 90%. I followed this advice religiously for a long time.

8. I filter my water. I didn’t go crazy with a whole-house filter system, because I was renting a New York apartment when first diagnosed with cancer. Instead, I bought an Aquasana countertop water filter for the sink (which I installed in the bathroom since it wouldn’t fit on my kitchen sink – you do what you have to do!) and an Aquasana shower filter. I also bought a Waterwise water distiller and used it for the first year of my recovery.

Travel tip: When traveling, I use a portable filter bottle, and I drink venti green and herbal teas at Starbucks since they triple-filter their water, sometimes with reverse osmosis!

9. I take a great probiotic. After much research, I settled on Garden of Life RAW Probiotics. I love that they use a wild kefir culture to provide a huge variety of different probiotic strains. These probiotics require refrigeration, so I’m careful about where I buy them.

10. I rebound for exercise. I bought a Pure Fun rebounder from Amazon for about $38 and started bouncing. I love trying to touch the ceiling as I jump, but you don’t have to be an acrobat to use this type of mini-trampoline. When I first started, I did “the health bounce,” which just involves standing on the trampoline on the balls of your feet, with feet shoulder width apart, and bouncing without leaving the surface. Why is rebounding so great? It increases lymphatic flow and gets your whole body moving — much like swimming!

What are your personal game-changers for wellness? I’d love to hear about it- send me a message!

Sep 112015
 

Something I called an “Hour of Power” was key to my cancer recovery in the first couple of years.

The reason why is that when I started my alternative program with my great doctor-ally, I was working full-time in an office, so time at home was limited. And my morning schedule was peppered with to-dos: take supplements; eat a giant breakfast; do qigong; exercise; do skin brushing; breathe deeply. Add to that the usual routine like showering and getting dressed, and I was overwhelmed.

So I developed the “Hour of Power.” When I woke up, I started my day with an affirmation. I’d look out the window and yell, “It’s GREAT to be alive!”

Right after that, I’d take pancreatic enzyme supplements and then spend the next 60 minutes before breakfast doing everything I could think of that was healthy. I crammed it in like a student studying for finals.

Exercise, Tea and Hydrotherapy

First I’d do a 15-minute qigong routine while staring out my window at the sky and the trees below in the courtyard. This routine learned from my tai chi teacher consisted of eight different positions that I held for about 2 minutes each while breathing deeply.

Then I’d hop on my mini-trampoline and rebound for another 10 minutes to get my lymphatic system moving.

After that I’d boil water for tea and brew a pot of Chinese Sencha (it was still too hot to drink, but I wanted to make sure it would be cool enough to drink when I was ready to drink it!).

I’d use a natural bristle-brush on my skin as a quick lymphatic massage and then hop in the shower. After showering for 15 minutes with alternating hot and cold water (hydrotherapy!), I’d get dressed, cook the rest of breakfast, and pack my supplements for the day.

The Breakfast Scramble

At the end of the Hour of Power was the Half Hour of Frantic Eating. I’d wolf down as much breakfast as possible (I couldn’t always finish everything!). If I wasn’t in a serious rush to make it to a meeting, I’d catch up on news and email while eating. If I was in a rush, I’d eat standing at my breakfast bar, inhaling 14-Grain cereal, yogurt mixed with flax oil, a soft-boiled egg, an apple, and raw almonds.

Lastly, I’d take all of my breakfast supplements, from liver powder to vitamin C, and then rush out the door: well fed, well exercised, and ready to heal another day.

My point in describing this routine is that YOU CAN DO IT. Even if your time is limited, even if you work a full-time job, one hour a day doing good-for-you things can have huge benefits in your life.

What would your own Hour of Power look like? How would you design it for maximum benefit?